Koraa

What happens where the salt water from the ocean and the sweet water from the river meet? Chocolatillo straw

Women living in the border between Ecuador and Colombia, carefully work the chocolatillo straw.

The Epera Siapadee community emigrated from their natal Colombia in the late 1960’s and were sadly displaced from their land due to violence and forced recruitment by irregular armed groups.

Now they have settled in Ecuadorian territory, 30 minutes by boat along the Cayapas river. The Epera keeps a community based economy and production. Their main sources of income are hegemonically agriculture and fishing.

Although their income has decreased considerably, they have seen a slight growth through their handcrafts, but still they continue to live under the poverty line.

indigenous

Koraa is a group of 25 associated women supporting 60 families. They have mastered the art of hand weaving the chocolatillo straw, bringing to life beautiful and lightweight baskets, in different shapes and carefully curated.

indigenous

Koraa counts with the support of our partner ‘Manos de Colores: Artesanias del Ecuador’, a social innovation hub, that generates opportunities for artisan women living with less than a dollar a day, through a program that consists of a six-month training and workshop based on a co-creation methodology.

related posts

Koraa

Koraa

What happens where the salt water from the ocean and the sweet water from the river meet? Chocolatillo straw. Women living in the border between Ecuador and Colombia, carefully work...

artSimiatug Llakta

artSimiatug Llakta

Simiatug, pronounced shimi-AH-took and equivalent to “Mouth of the Wolf” in Kichwa, is a remote village tucked away in a valley in between the Andes (inside the Chimborazo Wildlife Reserve)....

Wawamama

Wawamama

Wawamama is a social initiative dedicated to the production of decorative items for the little ones at home and driven by the desire to revalue handcraft work. Led by the...